Category Archives for "Self-help and Career"

January 21, 2017

The Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living

The Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living

To find happiness we try to avoid or get rid of bad feelings, but the harder we try, the more bad feelings we create.

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What’s it about?

Russ Harris writes that everything we believe about happiness is inaccurate, misleading or false. These beliefs make us miserable – our very efforts to find happiness actually prevent us from achieving it. Everyone is in the same boat – including all those psychologists, psychiatrists, and self-help gurus who claim they have the answers.

The Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living:

  1. A growing body of scientific research suggests we are all caught in a powerful psychological trap. We lead our lives ruled by many unhelpful and inaccurate beliefs about happiness – ideas widely accepted because “everyone knows they are true.”
  2. Despite the West’s wealth it’s inhabitants don’t appear to be happy. Despite all the advice from experts and gurus, human happiness does not appear to be diminishing but growing by leaps and bounds. The statistics are staggering. 30% of the adult population will suffer from a recognized psychological disorder; depression is widespread; a quarter of people will suffer drug or alcohol addiction at some point in their life. One in 10 people attempt suicide and a half contemplate it for a period of at least two weeks or more. It’s not a pretty picture, lasting happiness is not normal.

Happiness Myths:

  1. Happiness Is the Natural State for All Human Beings. Despite all the evidence to the contrary, our culture insists that humans are naturally happy. When you add in all the misery caused by problems that are not classified as psychiatric disorders – loneliness, divorce, work stress, midlife crises, relationship issues, social isolation, prejudice, and lack of meaning and purpose – you get an idea of how rare happiness is. Unfortunately, we often walk around with the belief that everyone else is happy. This creates even more unhappiness.
  2. If You’re not Happy, You’re Defective. Western society assumes that mental suffering is abnormal. It is seen as a weakness or illness, a product of a mind that is faulty or defective. Consequently, when we do experience painful thoughts and feelings, we often criticize ourselves for being weak or stupid.
  3. To Create a better Life, We Must Get Rid of Negative Feelings. We live in a feel-good society, a culture thoroughly obsessed with finding happiness. And what does society tell us to do? To eliminate ‘negative’ feelings and accumulate ‘positive’ ones  in their place. This despite that everything meaningful we embark on in life – jobs, careers, families, relationships, business projects – will all generate both positive and negative experiences. There will be wonderful feelings, but there will also be disappointments, set-backs and frustrations. Not to mention stress, fear and anxiety.
  4. You Should Be Able to Control What You Think and Feel. We actually have much less control over our thoughts and feelings than we would like. It’s not that we have no control; it’s just that we have much less than most people would have us believe. However, we do have a huge amount of control over our actions. And it’s through taking action that we can create a rich, full, and meaningful life.

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Thoughts, feelings, sensations, and memories are not that easy to control. It’s not that you don’t have any control over these things; it’s just that you have much less control than you thought. Or else why aren’t we all living in perpetual bliss?

The actual degree of control we have over our thoughts and feelings depends largely on how intense they are, and what situation we are in – the less intense the feelings and the less stressful the situation, the more control we have.

The more intense our thoughts and feelings are and the more stressful environment we are in, the less effective our attempts at control will be.

Increasing self-awareness is a start. Noticing your thoughts and feelings during the day, possibly keeping a journal. In order to better deal with unpleasant thoughts we can make room for them, instead of pushing them away. We can feel them, explore them. You can observe yourself thinking, using a powerful, but often under-appreciated aspect of the mind, that of the Observer Self. And you can clarify what is important to you by understanding and connecting with your values and taking action to realize them.

Take Away Points and Context

  • The Human mind has given us an enormous advantage as a species. It enables us to make plans, invent things, coordinate actions, analyze problems, share knowledge, learn from our experiences, and imagine new futures. It was built for threat detection and survival, however, not happiness. Fleeting positive emotions helped drive survival-conducive behavior.
  • Life involves pain. Sooner or later we will all grow infirm, get sick and die. We will lose valued relationships through rejection, separation, or death, and we will come face to face with crises, disappointment and failure.
  • Great advice about how to improve your life comes at you from all directions: find a meaningful job, do this work-out, get out in nature, take-up a hobby, join a club, contribute to charity, learn new skills, have fun with friends, and so on. All of these activities can be deeply satisfying if you do them because they are important and meaningful to you. If these activities are used to mainly escape unpleasant thoughts and feelings, chances are, they won’t be very rewarding.
  • To find happiness we try to avoid or get rid of bad feelings, but the harder we try, the more bad feelings we create. Try to look at the costs of avoidance, examine your negative feelings, can you help understand and diffuse them?

 

 

The Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living. You Comments Welcome below.

January 21, 2017

Die Broke: Quit Today Pay Cash Don’t Retire

Die Broke: Quit Today Pay Cash Don’t Retire

What does it do to a person's soul when they have a reason to look forward to the death of a loved one?

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What’s it about?

Stephen M. Pollan writes that our approach to money, career, and much else in life is outmoded, based on principles and beliefs that come from the past. Your fear of dying broke is an early twentieth-century fear carried forward to twenty-first-century life.

Die Broke: Quit Today Pay Cash Don’t Retire

  1. Employment is not as secure as it used to be, don’t vest too much in any one job. Mentally separate yourself from your employer and realize that you are on your own. Once you quit in your head, being fired is no longer a real threat: You’re already a free agent on the lookout for your next opportunity.
  2. It’s rare today for a job to be rewarding both emotionally and financially. Be mercantile. View your job as an income-generating device. Focus on the job, not your whole career. Any other benefits other than money are purely secondary.
  3. Pay cash. Frugality has long-lasting psychic rewards. Working hard to save for something means you’ll truly value it when you get it, and, you’ll be careful about what you buy. You’ll earn interest while saving rather than paying interest while borrowing.
  4. Don’t retire. The world is changing. People are living longer, company pensions are shrinking, so is state support, the retirement age is rising. Don’t hang all your hopes on retiring at 65. Plan to work for longer. There are proven psychological benefits if you can continue working in work you find acceptable or even enjoy.
  5. Die Broke. Inheritance made sense when it consisted of fixed assets – like a family farm, a business, or a set of tools – and was part of an implicit contract between generations. This has changed. Inheritance hurts the hoarder who chooses not to spend money on themselves. It can hurt families and even the recipients who may be less motivated to go out and earn themselves.
  6. Inheritance is also inefficient, subject to large amounts of tax, and hurts society by keeping wealth locked up in real-estate.

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Having a mercantile approach doesn’t mean obsessing over money. It simply means using your job to generate the money you need to pursue your goals, rather than looking to the job itself to fulfill those goals. A career is simply a series of such jobs viewed from above and placed in some kind of context. And a life’s work need not be what is done on the job.
Forget about retirement. Look at your working life as a lifelong journey up and down hills rather than as a single climb up a steep cliff that ends with a fatal step off the edge at the arbitrary age of sixty-five.

Combined, the four points made in Die Broke offer an alternative way to plan our finances, lives and careers. We can view work not as a life-long slog that ends with freedom and steady decline, but as a series of adventures. Much will be done to earn us money, some will be done for enjoyment. That money will go further if we are frugal and save, taking advantage of tax benefits to put money away for retirement. That retirement should never come, though, as you may find it more profitable and enjoyable to keep working. You can also keep spending. Month-long trips abroad, studying Renaissance art in Italy, going to the cinema and theater more often…

“The last check should be to the undertaker…and it should bounce.”

Take Away Points and Context

  • Frugality offers dramatic real-life benefits – it’s a life preserver that can keep you from drowning in a sea of red ink.
  • Estates and potential inheritance can hurt families. Be inserting economic self-interest into emotional decisions, they can damage family dynamics and relationships. What does it do to a persons soul when they have a reason to look forward to the death of a loved one?
  • Saving, persevering in jobs you don’t like, spending wisely, searching for meaningful pursuits, alternative employments and dying broke are all things to consider.

 

 

Die Broke: Quit Today Pay Cash Don’t Retire. Comments welcome below.
January 20, 2017

Feel the Fear And Do it Anyway

Feel the Fear And Do it Anyway

Our lives are often ruled by fears, even for the most seemingly successful people.

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What’s it about?

Susan Jeffers’ classic on understanding and dealing with fears. How to turn your fear and indecision into confidence and action.

Feel the Fear And Do it Anyway:

Everyone has fears in their life and they can be broken down into three levels.

Level One Fears. These are the surface story. Fears that happen such as aging, becoming disabled, retirement, being alone, children leaving home, natural disasters, loss of financial security, change, dying, war, illness. Also fears that require action such as going back to school, making decisions, changing career, making friends, ending or beginning a relationship, public speaking, using the telephone, asserting oneself, losing weight, being interviewed, driving.

Level Two Fears. Behind level one fears are level two fears, fears to do with the ego. Rejection, Success, Failure, Being Vulnerable, Being Conned, Helplessness, Disapproval, Loss of Image. All these fears are to do with inner states of mind. They are generalized fears and can affect many areas of a person’s life. A fear of rejection will affect friends, relationships, job interviews etc…

Level Three Fear. At the bottom of every fear is the fear that you can’t handle whatever life may throw at you. All fears all translate to the level three fear:

  • I can’t handle illness.
  • I can’t handle a mistake.
  • I can’t handle losing my job.
  • I can’t handle getting old.
  • I can’t handle being alone.
  • I can’t handle making a fool out of myself.
  • I can’t handle success.
  • I cant handle failure.
  • I can’t handle being rejected.
  • And so on and so forth….

 

The Truths

  1. To diminish your fear you must trust in your ability to handle whatever comes your way. If you’re feeling fear this means you are not feeling good enough about your abilities to cope. Develop trust in yourself, say to yourself: “Whatever happens to me, given any situation, I can handle it.”
  2. Fear will never go away as long as you continue to grow. As long as you set new goals, take new risks, challenge yourself, you will always feel some fear.
  3. The only way to get rid of the fear of doing something is to go out and do it. The ‘doing it’ comes before the fear goes away. There is no waiting until you feel better.
  4. The only way to feel better about something is to go out and do it. Many successful people have felt fear and pushed through it.
  5. Everyone feels fear whenever they are on unfamiliar territory. Even Presidents and CEOs feel fear doing something new.
  6. Pushing through fear is less frightening than living with the underlying fear that comes from a feeling of helplessness. Everyone feels fear as they move through life. The more helpless we feel, the more severe is the undercurrent of dread we have facing situations we know we have no control over.

 

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So Commit! Commit yourself to pushing through the fear and becoming more than you are at the present moment. The you that could be is absolutely colossal. You don’t need to change what you are doing – simply commit to learning how to bring whatever you do in life the loving and powerful energy of your Higher self.

Choosing to Say Yes

Charles chose to rehabilitate himself after a being paralyzed from the waist down. Before the accident, Charles had been blind to the fact his life had meaning. Now he believes he was more handicapped before the accident; only since then has he derived satisfaction from living.

Giving Away

Genuine giving is altruistic and makes us feel better. Give away your thanks, time, money, and love. When we give from a place of love, rather than a place of expectation, we usually get more back to us than we imagine.

Take Away Points and Context

  • Our lives are often ruled by fears, even the most seemingly successful people. These fears can be understood on different levels. Understanding our fears and their underlying causes is one step to helping us strengthens our ability to cope with whatever life throws at us.
  • Trying is more important than success. Understanding and strengthening our ability to cope with our fears means we can take more risks. Changing beliefs and habits take time. We all have a right to a life free of fear.
  • Understand you fears and then…do it anyway.

 

Feel the Fear And Do it Anyway: Comment Welcome Below.

 

January 20, 2017

Knowing When to Quit (And When to Stick)

Knowing When to Quit (And When to Stick)

We are often seduced by stories of innate talent and instant success and forget the effort required there.

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What’s it about?

Seth Godin writes a book on quitting, specifically strategic quitting. Every new project (or career or relationship) starts out exciting and fun. Then it gets harder and less fun, until it hits a low point – really hard, really not fun. At this point you may be in a Dip, which will get better if you keep pushing, or a Cul-de-Sac, which will never get better no matter how hard you try.

It benefits to know which one you are in.

Knowing When to Quit (And When to Stick):

  1. Benefits accrue to those who are able to push a bit longer than most. Benefits also accrue to those with the guts to quit early and refocus their efforts on something else.
  2. The market place loves a winner. The number one in any marketplace often accrues 30% or more of sales.
  3. The mass market is dying. There is no longer one best song or coffee. Now there are a million micro-markets, but each micro-market still has a best.
  4. The dip is the long slog between starting and mastery. It can act as a screen or barrier to keep the unmotivated out. A typical resume of any CEO shows they’ve endured a twenty-five year Dip before landing the job. There are all sorts of dips.
  5. The Cul-de-Sac (French for “Dead End”) is a situation where you work and work and nothing gets better. A Cul-de-Sac keeps you from doing something else. Stick with the Dips that are likely to pan out, quit the Cul-de-sacs to focus your resources.
  6. If it’s worth doing then its probably has a Dip. Because few people work through the Dip there is scarcity, scarcity creates value.

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The market wants to see you persist. It demands a signal from you that you’re serious, powerful, accepted, and safe. The bulk of a market, any market, is made up of those folks who are in the middle of the bell curve, the ones who want to buy something proven and valued.

You know it, but you may not be doing anything about it. When it comes right down to it, right down to the hard decisions, are you quitting any project that isn’t a Dip? Or is it just easier not to rock the boat, to hang in there, to avoid the short-term hassle or changing paths?

Superstars

Superstars are in fields with steep Dips. There is a barrier between those who try and those who succeed. This isn’t for everyone, that’s why there are so few Superstars. To succeed in the Dip you need to quit all your Cul-de-Sacs. You must quit all the projects, investments and endeavors that don’t offer you the same opportunity.

Take Away Points and Context

  • We are often seduced by stories of innate talent and instant success. An actress being discovered at the local drugstore, an entrepreneur or novelist who makes it big. It seems easy and exciting and we forget the effort required before-hand to get them there.
  • Quitting in a Dip can be bad short term decision, if you want success you will need to work through the Dip. Strategic quitting is a conscious decision you make based on the choices available to you. If you realize you are at a dead-end, seeing no improvement at all, quitting is a smart, reasonable choice.
  • Quitting in a Dip can mean settling for less. Not everyone wants to be a CEO, success is how you define it. That success may come through quitting Cul-de-Sacs and working through Dips.

 

The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick)

Seth Godin

A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestseller

 

Knowing When to Quit (And When to Stick). Comment Welcome below.

December 29, 2016

Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World

The two core abilities for thriving in the information economy are the ability to master hard things and to produce at a high level.

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What’s it about?

Cal Newport looks at the need for ‘deep work,’ the ability to focus for uninterrupted periods of time and gain a deep understanding of a subject, while forming connections and improvisations. He argues that deep work is rare, valuable and meaningful, and harder to achieve in an age of increasing distractions.

Deep Work:

  1. The two core abilities for thriving in the information economy are the ability to master hard things and the ability to produce at a high level, in terms of both quality and speed. Both depend on your ability to do deep work.
  2. Deliberate practice needs your attention to focus on a specific skill you are trying to master or improve. You receive feedback so you can correct your approach and keep focusing your attention where its most productive.
  3. Within the world of business, open-plan offices, meetings, chance encounters and intrusive communication technologies are favored over the ability to do deep work. Many of these decrease a person’s ability to do deep work. Connections and collaboration often come at the expense of being able to focus. As do social media or similar technologies.
  4. Research suggest human beings are at their best when immersed  in something challenging. Deep work can lead to the development of skills that will make a career rewarding.
  5. It’s possible to train yourself to do deep work in snatches throughout the day, between other tasks.
  6. A societal belief that new technology must be good, combined with extensive marketing by big technology firms means that technologies are often adopted without critical reflection on their utility.

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Discipline 1: Focus your most energy on the most important, reduce time on ‘shallow’ work.

Discipline 2: Reserve and record time spent in deep work

Discipline 3: Undertake weekly reviews, to work out what went well and what didn’t

Be Lazy: Give yourself downtime after work. Switch off.

Downtime:

  • a) aids insight
  • b) helps recharge energy
  • c) usually replaces work that is not that important anyway.

Avoid new technology: Schedule time on the internet and social media both at work and at home.

Meditate: Focus your attention on a problem while undertaking physical activity.

  • a) be wary of distractions (thinking of easier things) and looping (going over and over what you already know).
  • b) structure your deep thinking
    • i) identify the relevant variables to the problem and keep them in mind,
    • ii) identify and work on your next step question (the next thing you need to do),
    • iii) assuming you’ve solved the problem, review and consolidate your answer.

Quit Social Media

While social media have some benefits, the downsides may outweigh these. A tool should only be adopted if its positive impacts outweigh its negative impacts on reaching your goal. Not every new technology is good, and consideration is needed before we decide if and how we are to adopt them in our lives. Even when technologies are adopted we should be careful to use them not so much for entertainment, but to further our career and life goals.

Take Away Points and Context

  • Deep work is not for everyone. It requires hard work and difficult habits. It may involve confronting that your best is not (yet) that good and doing away with an artificial sense of purpose that comes from being ‘busy’.
  • For some it can, however, be rewarding and productive. Learning about deep work and the many obstacles to undertaking it seems useful.

 

Full Article:

This is my own review of So Good Can’t Ignore You, for more on this topic and other subjects see www.mattmcginty.net, or see the book below.

So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love

by Cal Newport

Hatchet Book Group, 256 pp, $14.60.

 

Deep Work. Comments welcome below

December 29, 2016

So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love

Telling someone to follow their passion may potentially lead to a career riddled with confusion and angst.

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What’s it about?

Cal Newport looks at the passion hypothesis: that following your passion is what we all should do, arguing instead that job satisfaction comes through building up skills and then trading these for control. Along the way he introduces us to new concepts and mental models such as the craftsman mentality, career capital and control traps, illuminating the essential factors that make people satisfied with their job.

So Good They Can’t Ignore You:

  1. Passion is rare and dangerous. Few of us know what we are passionate about, often what we think will make us happy does not. There is a whole industry built up marketing the belief that courage is all you need in order to follow your passion. This can be dangerous if it means taking risks and forgoing the acquisition of education or skills that often lead to life-satisfaction.
  2. Craftsmen work with effort and clarity at what they do and any job can count as a craft. The craftsman mindset asks what can you do for the world, not what they world can do for you. It might be better to put aside your ideas of following your passion and become good at what you do. The craftsman approach can be the foundation on which you build a strong career.
  3. All good jobs seems to have three basic components. Creativity, Impact and Control. In short, we are most satisfied when we feel free to be creative, when we feel our work impacts and improves the lives of others and when we feel we are in control, with autonomy to work when, where and how we want to.
  4. In order to gain these three things we need to develop skills that are rare and valuable. By working with a craftsman mentality we can build up these skills. The better our skill-set the better our career capital and the more we can trade this capital for impact and autonomy.
  5. Deliberate practice is the key to building career capital through rare and valuable skills. Deliberate practice means 10,000 hours of practice, but with feedback built into it. It is stretching your ability to where it is uncomfortable and then receiving feedback.
  6. When you come to exchange your career capital for more control you will come across obstacles or control traps. Your employer will fight against your bid for more control. A bid for control can go wrong if you don’t have the capital to back it up.

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Rule 1: The passion hypothesis is not just wrong, it’s also dangerous. Telling someone to “follow their passion” is not just an act of innocent optimism, but potentially the foundation for a career riddled with confusion and angst.

Rule 2: Regardless of how you feel right now, building a craftsman mindset will be the foundation on which you can build a compelling career. Adopting a craftsman mindset first means passion follows.

Rule 3: Giving people more control over what they do and how they do it increases their happiness, engagement, and sense of fulfillment.

The 10,00 hour rule: The idea that excellence at performing a complex task requires a critical minimum level of practice.

So Good They Can’t Ignore You

The phrase encaptures the idea that with deliberate practice you will build the skills necessary for a successful career and a successful career can be used to create missions. Missions can bring a unifying focus to a career and they focus energy toward a useful goal. They require career capital, little bets (which may or may not work out), and to be remarkable (i.e. worth remarking on).

Take Away Points and Context

  • While some people are able to locate a passion and follow it these cases are rare. For the vast majority of people there is no pre-ordained vocation or single pre-existing passion.
  • Most likely one of the core components of your ideal job will be the idea of control. Others will include impact and creativity. Acquire career capital and trade it for these things.
  • The craftsman mentality does not work in areas where: there are no opportunities to distinguish yourself, where your job focuses on things you think are useless or bad for the world, or where you are forced to work with people you dislike.

 

Full Article:

This is my own review of So Good Can’t Ignore You, for more on this topic and other subjects see www.mattmcginty.net, or see the book below.

So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love

by Cal Newport

Hatchet Book Group, 256 pp, $14.60.

 

So Good They Can’t Ignore You. Comments welcome below.

December 28, 2016

Your Money or Your Life: 9 Steps to Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence

Financial Independence is the point where you can live off your savings. The more you can save now, the earlier that time will come.

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What’s it about?

Joe Dominguez and Viki Robin’s classic book on transforming your relationship with money and achieving financial independence. A book about capitalism, consumerism, money and what it means to us, and how to find meaning in life by doing work we love. Making a living, not a dying.

A book for anyone who wants to live and work on their terms, not societies, and needs money only to survive, not for status.

Your Money or Your Life:

  1. The Industrial Revolution was successful in providing the material goods that were necessary for a basic standard of living in Western Society. This point was reached some 40 years ago.
  2. By the early 1920s the capacity of machinery to fill human needs was so successful the economy was slowing down. Workers were asking for a shorter workweek and more leisure to enjoy the fruits of their labours. They did not seem as instinctively eager to buy new goods and services (like cars, chemicals, appliances and entertainment) as they did the old ones (like food, clothing, and shelter).
  3. Two sectors of American society were alarmed at this trend. The moralists, who believed that idle hands would do the work of the devil, and the industrialists, who were afraid of damage to economic growth. The first worried about corruption of the Protestant work ethic, the second feared that workers would choose leisure over consumption (at their expense).
  4. Culture was reconfigured to educate people to want things that they didn’t need. Art, science and industry came to serve a new concept, that of ‘standard of living,’ convincing workers to pursue higher levels of consumption rather than stop and be satisfied.
  5. Instead of leisure being relaxing activity, it became an opportunity to consume –  travel and vacations meant the consumption of even leisure itself .
  6. Several research studies have confirmed that above a certain subsistence level money does not make you happy. There is a fulfilment curve at which overconsumption actually deceases happiness.

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So here we are the most affluent society that has had the privilege to walk the face of the earth, and were stuck with our noses to the grindstone, our lives in a perpetual loop between home and job and our hearts yearning for something that’s just over the horizon.

We have come to believe that it is our right to consume. If we have money we can buy whatever we want, whether or not we need it, use it or even enjoy it. After all, it’s a free country. And if we don’t have the money…heck, what are credit cards for?

Born to shop. Whoever dies with the most toys wins. Life, liberty and the pursuit of material possessions.

A new relationship

As well as its transactional value money can be about power, security, status and social acceptance. Understanding your relationship with money and what it costs you to obtain is the first step to getting control of your finances. What does your job cost you? Take off the holidays, the commute, the meals out, the bottles of wine: all the things you might do to drown out your despair. How much of your daily expenses are really needed?

The authors ask us to be diligent and ruthless in understanding our earnings and expenditure and ensuring that we always save more than we spend.

Take Away Points and Context

  • The planet is showing signs of nearing its capacity to handle the results of our economic growth and consumerism. Water shortages, topsoil loss, global warming, species extinction, natural resource degradation and depletion, and air pollution. The world will be unable to live as the West has done for the last 40-50 years.
  • Society exhibits a caste mentality with regard to your status, derived through what job you do and how much it earns you. Numerous psychotherapists have documented the effect of this social belief system. A continuous supply of ‘successful’ professionals with empty souls and burnt out bodies showing up to take a seat at the clinicians chair.
  • Financial Independence is the point where you can live of your savings. The more you can save now, the earlier that time will come. Work thereafter is a choice, not a trap.

 

Full Article:

This is my own review of Your Money or Your Life, for more on this topic and other subjects see www.mattmcginty.net, or see the book below.

Your Money or Your Life: 9 Steps to Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence: Revised and Updated for the 21st Century

by Joe Dominguez and Viki Robin

Viking Penguin, 363 pp, $9.55.

 

Your Money or Your Life. Comments Welcome below.